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dc.creatorTheodoridou, K.en
dc.creatorVasilopoulou, V. A.en
dc.creatorKatsiaflaka, A.en
dc.creatorTheodoridou, M. N.en
dc.creatorRoka, V.en
dc.creatorRachiotis, G.en
dc.creatorHadjichristodoulou, C. S.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-23T10:49:47Z
dc.date.available2015-11-23T10:49:47Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier10.1016/j.ijid.2013.02.009
dc.identifier.issn1201-9712
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11615/33621
dc.description.abstractBackground: Bacterial meningitis continues to be a serious, often disabling infectious disease. The aim of this study was to assess the possibility that treatment influences the development of sequelae in childhood bacterial meningitis. Methods: Two thousand four hundred and seventy-seven patients aged 1 month to 14 years with acute bacterial meningitis over a 32-year period were enrolled in the study. Data were collected prospectively from the Meningitis Registry of a tertiary university teaching hospital in Athens, Greece. Treatment was evaluated through univariate and multivariate analysis with regard to sequelae: seizure disorder, severe hearing loss, ventriculitis, and hydrocephalus. Results: According to the multinomial logistic regression analysis, there was evidence that penicillin, an all-time classic antibiotic, had a protective effect on the occurrence of ventriculitis (odds ratio (OR) 0.17, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.05-0.60), while patients treated with chloramphenicol had an elevated risk of ventriculitis (OR 17.77 95% CI 4.36-72.41) and seizure disorder (OR 4.72, 95% CI 1.12-19.96). Cephalosporins were related to an increased risk of hydrocephalus (OR 5.24, 95% CI 1.05-26.29) and ventriculitis (OR 5.72, 95% CI 1.27-25.76). The use of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole increased the probability of seizure disorder (OR 3.26, 95% CI 1.08-9.84) and ventriculitis (OR 8.60, 95% CI 2.97-24.91). Hydrocortisone was associated with a rise in hydrocephalus (OR 5.44, 95% CI 1.23-23.45), while a protective effect of dexamethasone (OR 0.82, 95% CI 0.18-3.79) was not statistically significant. Conclusions: Current study findings suggest that the type of antimicrobial treatment for childhood bacterial meningitis may influence in either a positive or a negative way the development of neurological sequelae. (C) 2013 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en
dc.source.uri<Go to ISI>://WOS:000324172200010
dc.subjectBacterial meningitisen
dc.subjectChilden
dc.subjectPrognosisen
dc.subjectSequelaeen
dc.subjectTreatmenten
dc.subjectPROGNOSTIC-FACTORSen
dc.subjectDEXAMETHASONE THERAPYen
dc.subjectCHILDRENen
dc.subjectNEUROTOXICITYen
dc.subjectREGISTRYen
dc.subjectCORTICOSTEROIDSen
dc.subjectCHILDHOODen
dc.subjectOUTCOMESen
dc.subjectPATIENTen
dc.subjectINFANTSen
dc.subjectInfectious Diseasesen
dc.titleAssociation of treatment for bacterial meningitis with the development of sequelaeen
dc.typejournalArticleen


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